Gamelan Orchestra (1952) Mandera ‎Dancers Of Bali (LP) Columbia Masterworks ‎– ML 4618

Gamelan Orchestra

from the Village of Pliatan, Bali, Indonesia

Mandera ‎Dancers Of Bali

Under Direction of Anak Agung Gde

Produced by John Coast

1952
Columbia Masterworks ‎– ML 4618

*** noteworthy

It’s easy to see why jazz musicians found inspirations and influences in Asian dance music like this. The nature of dance made this music fiery, frantic, and avant garde. And it wasn’t improvisation, it sure sounded like that.

Likely while the dancers responded to the music, the music responded to the dancers.


This makes one wonder about the profound effect dancers had on music, not just in Asian, but in America as well.

— winch (author of )

 

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Perez Prado (1958) Dilo (Ugh!) LP (RCA LPM-1883)

Perez Prado

Dilo (Ugh!)

1958

(RCA LPM-1883)

**** (recommended)

Instead of just using a bunch of rushed filler to release an album to house the big hit “Patricia,” Prado and the band use the hit to introduce new listeners to a solid set while showing old fans that hot singles weren’t going to spoil the fun.


Along with the horns, percussion, organ, and ugh!, a guitar helps cut a groove through on several cuts.


While jazz fans were looking elsewhere for their Cuban fix in 1958, mainstream middle class just needed heavy doses of this cat.  This album clearly shows why.

— winch (author of

 

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Paul Winter Consort (1973) Icarus (LP)

Paul Winter Consort

Icarus

Epic 31643

1973
Producer: George Martin

Rating:*** (Noteworthy)

Winter continues his move away from jazz with this set, sticking to a unigue folk sound and helping to lay down some firm foundations for what would become the genre called world music.  While most of the Consort had already formed Oregon by this time, Winter fortunately managed to retain them for this outing.  In fact, the Oregon members provide most of the material for this album, and fans of Oregon will want to check out this set.  This isn’t perhaps as spontaneous or adventurous as much of Oregon’s material, but this was likely Winter’s finest offering.

While I never considered Oregon as a band influenced by the Beatles, the George Martin production and the heavy use of Eastern instruments on this set perhaps helps point out a very creative extension of the Fab Four’s work.  This certainly offered the hippies and Beatles’ fans a much needed alternative to the post-Beatles singer/songwriter craze.  This set has some weaker moments, but mostly it’s quite enjoyable, and fans of Ralph Towner will certainly enjoy his contributions.

The band included Paul Winter (sax), David Darling (cello), Paul McCandless (horns), Ralph Towner (guitars, keyboards), Herb Bushler (bass), Collin Walcott (percussion).  Guests included Billy Cobham and Milt Holland on percussion.

— winch (author of…http://www.eight-track.com/Eight_Track_Publishing.php

 

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