Roy Clark & Gatemouth Brown (1979) Makin’ Music (LP) MCA 3161

Roy Clark & Gatemouth Brown

MakinMusic

MCA 3161

1979

Recorded October 31 – November 2, 1978 in Tulsa

**** recommended

This recording is clearly Gatemouth’s brand of American music, the sound  he’d been focusing on for decades–leaving the sad delta blues for other folks and focusing on the good-time sound–but Roy is a big part of this outing as well.  While some may see this as Roy doing something new, this is actually Roy getting back to his roots.

Throughout the set, the pair are unstoppable like a tag-team in the ring, with the girls and the Memphis horns helping punch it home, the group only slowing it down to let the sweat drip on a few cuts, mostly sticking with the rocking, rocking and rolling through Gatemouth, Roy Clark and producer Steve Ripley originals and a few takes on old standards, Ray Charles (and Johnny Cash’s) 1963 “Busted” (Harlan Howard), Ellington’s 1941 “Take the A Train” (Strayhorn) and Louis Jordan’s 1945 “Caledonia.”

Jordan would re-record “Caledonia” in 1956 with Mickey Baker on guitar and likely that was the version that provided at least some of the inspiration for the version on this album.  (When Erskine Hawkins released “Caledonia” in 1945, Billboard referred to the song as rock and roll, probably the first time that phrase was used to describe music.)  

 

It sounds like these two were having a blast, and while they strut their stuff and show off their chops, they keep a rein on the excess to make this record fun from go to whoa.

— winch (author of Kalamazoo: Growing Up Sideways in the 1970s and the two-part novel Junk Like That)

 

Billboard. April 21, 1945.  p 66.

 

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Jay Clayton (1980) All-Out (LP) Anima Productions 1J35

Jay Clayton

All-Out 

1980

Anima Productions 1J35

*** noteworthy


Clayton’s debut set as a leader, featuring interesting avant-garde vocals from Clayton, making musical sounds rather than singing lyrics, but turning that idea around when she sings a poem story into a version of Ornette Coleman’s “Lonely Woman,” that selection just Jay and her husband Frank Clayton on drums…the other cuts featuring the pair with Jane Ira Bloom on sax, Harvie Swartz on bass, Larry Karush on piano.


While listeners may find various cuts more interesting, the centerpiece and most enjoyable selection is the 11-minute “7/8 Thing,” a Clayton original that features four vocalists and kalimba by Bill Buchen. Most fans of jazz or avant-garde music will find something to enjoy on this unique outing.

– winch (author of the two-part novel Junk Like That and Kalamazoo: Growing Up Sideways in the 1970s)

Child Support (1985) Come to Amerika (LP) neophyte records (Berkeley, CA)

Child Support

Come to Amerika

1985

neophyte records (Berkeley, CA)

**** recommended


Punk from California, Sacramento perhaps…solid set likely influenced by the bands pushing hardcore into new directions (Husker Du…Big Boys…) and also perhaps influenced by the Wipers and Neil Young and the more interesting music of the mid 70s (Lou Reed, T. Rex and especially Ohio underground)…

…this group clearly delivering a message about the state of the States and trying to do something other than louder faster  without falling into some commercial new wave nonsense.

— winch

Nude Beach (2010) s/t (LP) 

Nude Beach

Self titled

2010

Mandible Records


Debut from this Brooklyn trio…power pop punk..sounding somewhat like Pittsburgh’s Beach Slang (who came after this band) and the Cynics (who came long before) and probably all the bands that influenced those bands…the Replacements… Springsteen…bands of the 60s–both the American garage power pop of that decade and bands like Buffalo Springfield…the earthy elements recalling Tom Petty…even chucking an easily recognizable instrumental nod to Memphis R&B, which is much appreciated since where would we be without the contributions of that town.


This is punk rock most anyone would enjoy, from your high school teacher to even your aging baby boomer aunt.  Enjoyable set, noteworthy 21st century garage.

— winch (author of Junk Like That and Kalamazoo: Growing Up Sideways in the 1970s)

Henry Mancini (1965) The Latin Sound of Henry Mancini (LP) RCA 3356

Henry Mancini

The Latin Sound of Henry Mancini

1965

RCA 3356

*** noteworthy

While Hank is of course the man (“Peter Gunn,” “Pink Panther,” “Moon River”….), unless you’re a huge fan of commercial orchestra music, you might as well leave most of his albums in the bin at the thrift store where you found them, but if you’re a fan of Latin lounge, this one is worth grabbing.