1970 collage

 

        1970     
        1970     
        1970     








winch
(author of Kalamazoo: Growing Up Sideways in the 1970s)

EIGHT-TRACK PUBLISHING.







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Herbie Hancock: Headhunters (1974) LP

Herbie Hancock 
Headhunters
Columbia (KC 32731)

1974

Rating: **** (Recommended)

Recorded 1973, released January 1974 (US & UK) reached #13 in US
I can’t stand fusion from the early 70s, or jazz-funk led by a keyboard player, but this set from Hancock is the shit.  
  
He has lots of flights of fancy, but the flights are like birds of prey soaring over a train traveling through a deep groove in the earth.  Essential listening for fans of funk.
— winch
(author of Kalamazoo: Growing Up Sideways in the 1970s)

Ike & Tina Turner: So Fine (1969) LP

Ike & Tina Turner 

So Fine
Pompeii 6000

1969

Reissued as Too Hot to Hold

Pickwick (3284)
Rating: **** (Recommended)

 

While a few cuts are better served on earlier albums, this has more than enough to keep it rolling.  Highly recommended.

— winch

(author of Kalamazoo: Growing Up Sideways in the 1970s)

http://eight-track.com/kalamazoo.html

http://www.amazon.com/Kalamazoo-Growing-Up-Sideways-1970s/dp/0692013865/ref=tmm_pap_title_0/192-1257870-3781939

Johnny Cash: True West (1965) LP

Johnny Cash 
Sings the Ballads of the True West
Columbia (C2L 38)
Produced by Don Law and Frank Jones 

1965

Rating: **** (Recommended)

While this perhaps would have been better served if distilled down to two sides, it’s still fairly strong from go to whoa, songs and lots of narration.

 The gatefold features some classic Cash liner notes, as well as other information–including a Western lingo glossary.  Recommended grab for fans of Cash.
— winch
(author of Kalamazoo: Growing Up Sideways in the 1970s)

Treat Her Right (1986) LP

Treat Her Right 
Treat Her Right
RCA (6884)
Major label 1988 reissue of 1986 debut 
Rating: **** (Recommended)
Mark Sandman’s pre-Morphine Boston blues band, quite different than the primitive frantic blues that the Gories were putting down in Detroit at the same time, but still similar in many ways, this band featuring an almost polished sound (w/ cool harmonica and various guitars) but keeping a rough edge and an honest feel (not like that stale museum blues by most white boys).  

This clearly comes from the Boston underground/barroom tradition, with one foot firmly planted in the Southern swamps, the band’s name obviously from the Roy Head song, solid set, especially side one, mostly originals by Sandman, Jim Fitting (harmonica) and David Champagne (guitar), covering “Everglades” (Harlan Howard) and “Where Did All the Girls Come From” (James Blood Ulmer).
 The original sleeve better fit the sound, and the sound of the original was likely a bit more raw, but even the clean sound can’t ruin this.  Good stuff.
— Winch
(author of Kalamazoo: Growing Up Sideways in the 1970s)